The London Plan

The Chelsea Society’s response to the Mayor’s consultation on the London Plan questions the assumption that further population growth in London is desirable, and objects to the inclusion in the Plan of a Crossrail 2 station in the King’s Road. The response has been written by Chris Lenon, a Member of the Society’s Planning Committee, and Chairman of KRACR.

1.0.5

The plan is based on forecast London population of 10.8m in 2041. This forecast has not been updated for the effect of the UK leaving the EU. Are updated forecasts available?
What will the quality of life be in London with this population? The plan calls for 1.32m new homes in the next 20 years – where will these homes be? How will the social infrastructure be paid for in terms of new schools, doctor surgeries, hospitals etc. Where will this infrastructure be located?
Can London sustain this level of population increase, in such a short period of time, without degrading the quality of life for residents?

1.2.5

The answer to increasing population in 1.0.5 is “intensification”. Do Londoners want to live in increased density housing? Do they want taller building to achieve this?
The consequences of intensification need to be spelled out to Londoners if this consultation is to be valid.

1.4.3

The plan calls for 1.32 million more homes in the next 20 years. 66,000 per year. Table 4.1 shows the target by borough for 10 years totalling 649,350. These targets are ambitious, are they attainable. Where are the targets for additional social infrastructure to support these increases?

1.4.13

The impact of Brexit is mentioned. There is no work on the impact of Brexit on population figures. This should be provided to validate the plan.
Figure 2.14 shows the annual gross migration flows 2016 – 2041. These show net outflows to other parts of the UK from London where the figures are split out. Since 1999, London has had a net outflow of population to the rest of the UK, its population growth has been from immigration from outside the UK and birth rate. This should be made clear in the plan.
Londoners leave London from the age of 30 because the cost of living and quality of life are poor. The Plan should be addressing this issue.

2.1.19

No Opportunity Area is identified for Chelsea / King’s Road. There is no justification for a Crossrail 2 station on the King’s Road given the criteria for Crossrail 2. The Plan still shows the station despite this and overwhelming opposition in the 2016 Public Consultation.

2.11

No Opportunity Area is identified for Chelsea / King’s Road. There is no justification for a Crossrail 2 station on the King’s Road given the criteria for Crossrail 2. The Plan still shows the station despite this and overwhelming opposition in the 2016 Public Consultation.
2.16

No Opportunity Area is identified for Chelsea / King’s Road. There is no justification for a Crossrail 2 station on the King’s Road given the criteria for Crossrail 2. The Plan still shows the station despite this and overwhelming opposition in the 2016 Public Consultation.

Figure 2.17

The map shows King’s Road East and West as District shopping centres. There is no justification for a Crossrail 2 station on the King’s Road given the criteria for Crossrail 2. The Plan still shows the station despite this and overwhelming opposition in the 2016 Public Consultation.

Figure 2.19

The map shows the social housing at the Cremorne and Lots Road estates as Strategic areas for regeneration. Local residents are opposed to the regeneration of these estates and have not be consulted about their inclusion.

3.9

Policy D9 is needed. Basement developments should require Planning permission given the impact on other residents both structurally but also during construction.

10.3.4

There is a case for Crossrail 2 but there is no justification for a Crossrail 2 station on the King’s Road given the criteria for Crossrail 2 in terms of relieving crowding on specific lines and as a generator of new housing. The Plan still shows the station despite this and overwhelming opposition in the 2016 Public Consultation. The Mayor and TFL should confirm as soon as possible that the proposed station is no longer part of Crossrail 2 as currently proposed to the Government. Given the other demands for infrastructure in London, wasting £1.2bn on a King’s Road station should be unthinkable.
A.1.3 shows King’s Road growth as a shopping centre as “incremental”. The King’s Road already has a PTAL score of 6.

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